Innovative technology without the FB hidden cost

Turning content into money can be a challenging proposition. It’s a noisy world filled with other companies trying to turn their content into money. How to get your content to surface above the noise and get noticed?

While we all agree people stare at their screens (including us), there is absolutely no guarantee they will actually pay attention to it or act on it. We’ve all experienced scrolling onto some really great content and thinking to ourselves “what a good idea,” then scrolling on and completely forgetting the original content. This typical scenario illustrates the difficulty in getting messages to go from the screen to the brain, and actually stay there.

To land customers and actually get an ROI on content, companies rely on pushing content onto screens. That is about ¼ of the battle. Getting the content out there is the easy part. Getting that content to stick is the challenge.

The perils of modern reading

To describe this very directly, getting your content from the screen into your viewers heads ain’t easy.

Attention transactions matter

It’s comforting to believe once your content is published, readers “just download” your carefully crafted message into their brains with 100% fidelity like a copy and paste. But modern reading environments are tough: noisy, frequently mobile, and often multiscreen. We all know multitasking is bad, yet we all do it because our modern devices and technology make it so easy. And today’s readers have fleeting attention spans that are just few swipes or clicks away from someone else’s content. Alerts, notifications, and breaking news are roadside hazards for your delivering your message. In the space between your published content and readers’ brains there’s a lot of room for information loss and message degradation. How to help your message get through?

The standard approach

Facebook does a great job of getting your content onto screens in front of people. It acts as technology that exists between you and your customers, and helps you get those customers. The events of that past months make the not-so-hidden cost is pretty clear. To get your content in front of people Facebook demands you place your content onto their platforms, where it happily exists as a data vampire, feeding on your content and making money selling and reselling your data.

 

tweet complaining about Facebook Data Breach

 

We don’t do that. Like Facebook we are technology that exists between your and your customers, but the similarities end there. Our approach keeps your content on your platforms. Our technology facilitates getting the message from the screen to your customers heads by making it easier to scan and remember information. And because we use a small (micro) charge per attention exchange as our business model, our interests are aligned. We succeed when your consumers read more.

Make it stick

Our innovative microtypography uses cues based on neuroscience to help get messages from screens to your customers’ brains. It makes messages sticky. There is no simpler way to put it.

 

Asym makes ideas stick better

 

It’s easy to get into the weeds here and dive into intricate details, but a 30,000 ft view of our technology looks like this.

Our team is stacked. We have a PhD in neuroscience who is a leading expert in word and letter recognition. Using a cutting-edge ingenious approach to visually group words  into chunks, he was able to identify the exact locations in text where readers’ eyes need cues in order to separate high-value and low-value sections of text.

Working with an ex-Google (and ex-YouTube, ex-eBay, and ex-PayPal) engineer, together they were able to deliver this cue-enhancing text chunking via a fast API to digital text. In approximately 60 milliseconds, the typography of every line on your page can be optimized for typical human reading patterns.

Readers scan and skim quicker, parse the document into sensible blocks of ideas, and retain those ideas more successfully than when reading text without the cues. This enhanced reading experience turns into more engagement (clicks), longer dwell times, greater page depth, and reduced bounce rates. The increased comprehension and engagement has real world consequences such as more add-to-cart transactions, more checkouts, and more conversions. It also happens to help people with low literacy read easier.

There is more to the inner workings of how we are able to lift conversion rates for every page of content on your site by 10-15% minimum, but don’t take our word for it. Test us. For free. Depending on the package you get, we can even tune the typography to suit the reading patterns and average reading level of your audience.

If you need a way to move the lever on every page in your site, regardless of if your site has 20 thousand or 20 million page views a month, it may be worth a try. We make your messages more sticky. You could even say we make them superstick.

You can reach us here.

Get it across innovatively. And nicely.

Our business model is built to serve you without the nasty surprises of the other business models that have been making the news. You can test us free, no commitment required to ensure the results we’ve driven for others work for you as well. Because there is no overhead expense and you can uninstall with no issues and no commitments, this is literally zero-risk.

Our technology is a different approach to winning customers. Like other approaches it exists to help get your content from screens into people’s heads, but the way we go about is very different from any other approach out there. We aren’t like others, but that may be a good thing.

Are you innovative enough to test us? Risk free?

 

Thanks for reading.

The Asym Team

Metrics – the ‘what pays the bills’ view

Asym is built to boost business success. That means defining ‘business success’ is a big deal.  At Asym we believe ‘delivering profit’ is most often the ultimate measure of business success, which is why our pricing structure requires no net spend. 

This post is the last in our series on Metrics. It highlights the metric that most clearly contributes to business profitability. It also offers examples of less common success paradigms and suggests metrics that may be more applicable in those specific situations.

The other posts in the series provide different perspectives on which metrics are most valuable. The first post looks at a Harvard Business Review perspective on how Tesla shows existing metrics are outdated. The second post helps make sense of metrics by grouping them into 4 broad categories. The third post presents the traditional view of metrics, with consumption metrics driving everything else. The fourth post considers the balanced view, with each metric contributing an equal measure to business success. The fifth post looks at the business view.

 

apple logo, representing business success

 

The horse before the cart

Apple is the most profitable company in the world. When it comes to defining business success, Apple is iconic. There are other metrics that are more open to evaluation and judgement – IBM or Microsoft may have more customers using their products (thus generating more engagement), and Facebook and Google may lead the field when it comes to offering consumable media. Different metrics yield different interpretations of success. Yet Apple having a net worth higher than all but the top 16 countries in the world has a gravitas other metrics struggle to deliver. Business success remains linked to the most profitable company. Profit drives business success so closely you could say profit is business success.

 

Profit drives business success so closely you could say profit is business success.

 

When it comes to which is the cart and which is the horse, it can be deceptively easy to put data science ahead of ultimate business success. There is a logical flow to seeing consumption metrics drive business success. Yet consumption metrics can be misleading when there are many people paying little attention. Getting the largest audience doesn’t work when that audience has no intention of purchasing, or is browsing your content to kill time.

We firmly believe when it comes to choosing metrics based on business success, profit is the ultimate measure that needs to inform all other choices. With a caveat.

 

Success paradigms

Business success is not the only measure of ‘success’. The Salvation Army may not be extremely profitable, yet in providing food, shelter and employment opportunities to marginalized people it ranks as one of the most successful. The Correspondent is not the largest media corporation, yet in terms of providing bias-free thought-provoking news articles, it ranks as an industry leader.

 

Use a feedback loop to choose appropriate metrics

 

Adapting your metrics to suit your success paradigm is key to creating feedback loops that build company success. Where ‘reaching the greatest amount of those in need’ is the success paradigm, the metrics used to inform decisions will be very different from the metrics involved in maximizing profit.

 

The profit problem solves itself

When profit is seen as the ultimate measure of business success, the thorny problem of choosing which metrics lead the cart and which metrics are the cart is already defined.

 

pic of cart and horse to illustrate which metric to invest in

 

Profit is the metric that leads the cart. Profit is the ultimate measure of business success. So software, usability choices, and investments that directly boost profit are clearly indicated. Profit is the action and result that pays the bills.

Which is why at Asym we offer a free trial period. You can directly test and get results to evaluate how Asym’s microcharge per dollar of profit delivered will affect your bottom line.

 

Summing up

Bain and Company have an article on navigating data analytics that has a total of 6 recommendations. To sum up with one quote:

 

“Many will rush to invest in the latest analytics software and infrastructure vendors and hire data scientists, but the ultimate winners will align these investments with their strategic and organizational needs in ways that lead to action and results.” 

– Bain and Company Management Consultants, 2017.

 

The two specific recommendations that stand out as most unexpected may be:

  1. Put business science before data science.
  2. Look well beyond the traditional metrics.

We agree.

Hopefully, our dive into the world of metrics has been useful. Its intention was to cut through the clutter and help you inform your success the best way possible. Which leads us to a final point.

 

pic of ship used to indicate the direction is yours to choose

 

Your definition of success matters. It may be (and often is) pure profit, but it doesn’t have to be. Your company is a ship, and we aren’t here to suggest there is a best way to steer it. Our job is to provide very specific technology that can help you get closer to your destination.

Connect with us and start a conversation to see if Asym can boost the metrics that matter to you.

Thanks for reading.

Chris, Ken, & Edward

P.S. 

Here is the Bain and Company insight article.

Metrics – the business view

At Asym we take a dedicated business view to prioritizing performance measurements. We focus on optimizing the elements that make most impact on the business.

This is the 5th post in our series on metrics. It ranks metrics according to direct impact on business success. This can be different for different companies: in many cases the metric that matters most comes down to the business model of the company.

The other posts in the series provide different perspectives on which metrics are most valuable. The first post looks at a Harvard Business Review perspective on how Tesla shows existing metrics are outdated. The second post helps make sense of metrics by grouping them into 4 broad categories. The third post presents the traditional view of metrics, with consumption metrics driving everything else. The fourth post considers the balanced view, with each metric contributing an equal measure to business success. The sixth post looks at the ‘what pays the bills’ view.

 

Some things matter more than others

The last article considered the ‘equal responsibility’ view, where each category of metric plays an equal role in eventual business success. The next perspective we present – the business view – argues some metrics are more valuable than others. There can be situations where the most valuable metrics are not the most top-of-mind.

The business view is the traditional view, inverted. Where the traditional view sees consumption metrics as the foundation to business success, the business view reverses the order.

Here is the traditional view, with consumption metrics driving the model and sales a distant consequence.

 

Metrics traditional view that consumption is best

 

Here is the business view, with sales driving the model and consumption metrics a distant consequence.

 

infographic - metrics from a business view

 

The business model matters

Between the traditional and the business view, which is best depends on perspective.

Consumption metrics tend to rule when number of eyeballs is the only driver and quality of attention doesn’t matter.

Ad-driven business models often use consumption metrics, with good results.

Sales metrics tend to rule when quality of attention does matter.

E-Commerce and subscription-driven business models can be misled by consumption metrics – sales metrics are a far greater indicator of success for these business models.

Many companies monetize the web using an ad-driven business model. This model is driven by consumption, and so puts emphasis on consumption metrics. This has circular effects which lead to the metrics industry constantly publishing articles on consumption metrics, stressing the importance of consumption metrics, and generally giving air-time to all things consumption. Internet behemoths Google and Facebook depend on consumption, which again tilts attention towards the over-riding importance of consumption metrics.

This leaves ecommerce and subscription-based companies in a tight spot. While consumption metrics are a shoe that fits ad-driven business models perfectly, it’s a shoe that doesn’t come close to fitting any company that depends on people acting on a message.

 

While consumption metrics are a shoe that fits ad-driven business models perfectly, it’s a shoe that doesn’t come close to fitting any company that depends on people acting on a message.

 

Consumption metrics from a business perspective

 

What does this mean for you?

For ecommerce and subscription-based companies, the internet is more like a superbowl ad. Getting 40 million views sounds great (especially in terms of consumption metrics), but those views don’t pay the bills. The metric that matters is how many of those views converted to sales. Much as a company that has great superbowl ads but poor sales won’t last long, any company outside of the ad-driven model that has great consumption metrics on the internet but poor sales metrics will also fail. For these companies, improving the impact of the messaging and optimizing conversion rates is the key to profit.

The next article (and last one in this series) is about ranking metrics in priority based on how significantly they affect ultimate business success. The article leans on insights from other industry leaders to focus on the challenges of creating and interpreting metrics. It also surfaces the number one metric your company needs to use as a compass when navigating digital transformation, strategy, and analytics.

Thanks for reading.

Chris, Ken, & Edward

Metrics – the ‘equal responsibility’ view

Asym stacks with existing optimization efforts to compound your results. The ‘equal responsibility’ model of metrics takes the same stacking approach.

This post is the fourth in our series on metrics. It introduces the idea that metrics can be seen as pillars, rather than a pyramid.

The other posts in the series provide different perspectives on which metrics are most valuable. The first post looks at a Harvard Business Review perspective on how Tesla shows existing metrics are outdated. The second post helps make sense of metrics by grouping them into 4 broad categories. The third post presents the traditional view of metrics, with consumption metrics driving everything else. The fifth and sixth posts look at the business view, and the ‘what pays the bills’ view, respectively.

 

Everything matters

The equal responsibility view goes somewhat counter to the traditional ‘start with lots of consumption and work from there’ view. With this less common approach, each metric is seen as equally necessary to ultimate success.

 

infographic - metrics equal responsibility view

 

Each element stacks with the other, with no one category taking the lion’s share. The entire process contributes to business success. As we reviewed in our previous post, this approach can avoid some of the errors introduced when consumption metrics are seen as the most significant drivers of business success.

 

Categories as pillars rather than pyramid

The last post shared a compelling graph revealing how essential quality of attention is. Mobile users outnumber desktop users, yet desktop users are almost 3 times more likely to purchase than mobile users. Tablet users about 2 times more likely.

The difference between mobile and the rest? Not many people slip a desktop or tablet into their back pocket and read while doing 5 other things. Mobile suffers from poor quality of attention.

 

Mobile conversion rates worse than desktop

 

Which matters when prioritizing metrics because when quality of attention enters the picture, metrics that indirectly indicate quality of attention (metrics such as engagement, leads, and sales) deserve more investment.

 

When quality of attention enters the picture, metrics that indirectly indicate quality of attention (metrics such as engagement, leads, and sales) deserve more investment.

 

Especially with companies that have suffered through one of the 3 misleading patterns which we described previously, consumption metrics no longer hold that strong anchoring position that is traditionally given them. Instead, every category becomes a pillar, each contributing the same value to the business success. No one category drives the business, yet none are unimportant.

 

Summing up

There is an intuitive reasonableness to the ‘equal responsibility’ approach.  Where other approaches to prioritizing metrics stress the importance of specific categories, the ‘categories as pillars’ model side-steps this bias. No one category of metrics is seen as paramount to the others.

When it comes to determining the model that is best suited for your company, both tradition and opinion are less-than-ideal guides. Insight, founded on data, can inform your decision. As we will see in the next article, a more aggressive model moves away from this moderate approach and completely inverts the traditional approach to metrics. Read on to uncover which approach best fits your needs.

 

Metrics – The traditional view

Asym works by increasing the quality of attention. Quality of attention is a challenging metric that does not always fit into a traditional view.

This post is the third in our series on metrics. It highlights the value placed on consumption metrics and brings in examples of specific situations where consumption metrics may be poor indicators of success.

The other posts in the series provide different perspectives on which metrics are most valuable. The first post looks at a Harvard Business Review article on how Tesla shows existing metrics are outdated. The second post helps make sense of metrics by grouping them into 4 broad categories. The fourth post considers the balanced view, with each metric contributing an equal measure to business success. The fifth and sixth posts look at the business view, and the ‘what pays the bills’ view, respectively.

 

Start with consumption

The easiest way to look at metrics is to predict maximizing consumption will maximize sales. There is a logical flow to assuming that the more people get in at the start of the process, the more people will finish at the end of the process. Starting with consumption as the foundation is an idea with clear merit.

 

Metrics traditional view that consumption is best

 

Do consumption metrics work?

For companies that get paid purely based on consumption metrics, this category clearly wins. Ad-based business models where revenue is directly linked to page views are an example here.

For companies where revenue is NOT purely generated through ads, there are 3 key elements that make this model work or fail.

In hindsight they appear obvious, yet in business practice these situations can often occur.

 

(1) Most clearly, if consumption metrics improve but sales are relatively unchanged, this model appears weak.

An example would be getting significantly more page views and dwell time. This often occurs as sites become optimized for mobile. If the viewers are there to kill time or avoid boredom (as is often the case with mobile users), more is not necessarily better. Without more sales, the increase in one category of metrics does little for business success.

(2) Less obviously, if consumption metrics are poor yet sales do well, this model appears weak.

This situation can occur in situations where many site users are poor sales candidates. When most of your users have no intention to buy, more users is not necessarily better. The core group that are actually potential buyers make it through to sales while everyone else loses interest.

(3) Finally, if consumption metrics fluctuate but sales remain steady, this model appears weak.

This pattern occurs when again there are many viewers but the quality of their attention is poor. If thousands of people periodically head downtown to watch sporting events, sites can get surges in traffic as those thousands of people dive onto sites out of boredom while on public transit. The boredom-motivated users provide noise, while the few that are interested buyers and actually do pay attention keep the business afloat.

 

Consumption counts less than quality of attention

Consumption skews reliably higher on mobile. If metrics based on consumption are the drivers for business strategy, its clear that investing in mobile is the right choice.  But consumption on mobile brings with it a more noisy and distracting environment, one that hurts the bottom line. Metrics based on revenue from sales reveal a clear picture. The least distracted users are almost 3 times more likely to buy when compared to the most distracted users.

 

Metrics based on revenue from sales reveal a clear picture. The least distracted users are almost 3 times more likely to buy when compared to the most distracted users.

 

Mobile conversion rates worse than desktop

 

In practical terms, that means if the mobile audience was twice as big as the desktop audience, the desktop audience would still contribute significantly more to profit and sales.

 

In practical terms, that means if the mobile audience was twice as big as the desktop audience, the desktop audience would still contribute significantly more to profit and sales.

 

Summing up

For companies selling page views, consumption is king. Consumption metrics work.

For e-commerce companies or other companies where messages matter, consumption is golden only when the right people – in the right frame of mind – are consuming the content. If it’s the wrong people, or the right people but in the wrong frame of mind—they may be paying distant attention to your site on their smartphone as they try to balance standing on a train without getting to close to the stranger next to them—consumption metrics can be a poor indicator of future sales.

 

If it’s the wrong people, or the right people but in the wrong frame of mind, consumption metrics can be a poor indicator of future sales.

 

Which makes indicators about frame of mind crucial to finding the right metrics to build business success. How much quality attention is being directed to your content?

The next article presents a less traditional approach that reveals the value of ‘stacking’ metrics.

 

Chart is from the latest Adobe Mobile Retail Report.

Essential optimization metrics organized into categories

With conversion rate optimization software like Asym, a key ingredient to profitability is measuring the true impact on business success. Which metrics actually deliver?

To get there we first need to put metrics into categories.

This is the second post in our series on metrics. It helps make sense of a wide variety of metrics by grouping similar metrics together into 4 broad categories.

The other posts in the series provide different perspectives on which metrics are most valuable. The first post looks at a Harvard Business Review perspective on how Tesla shows existing metrics are outdated. The third post presents the traditional view of metrics, with consumption metrics driving everything else. The fourth post considers the balanced view, with each metric contributing an equal measure to business success. The fifth and sixth posts look at the business view, and the ‘what pays the bills’ view, respectively.

 

Types of Metrics

Metrics come in all shapes and sizes, with more labels than a supermarket.

wordcloud of sales metricsanother wordcloud of sales metrics

Like a supermarket, it’s easier to find what you are looking for when metrics are organized and grouped together. Lead generation doesn’t belong alongside page views, and putting time on a page alongside more sales is like putting engine oil with onions. They don’t belong together because they do different things.

So what metrics belong together, and where does the bread and butter lie?

 

Metrics organized by category

Metrics can roughly be organized into 4 main categories:

detailed look at categories of metrics

 

When people talk about Page Views, Downloads, Social Mentions, and Time on a Page, they are referring to Consumption metrics.

When people talk about Likes / Shares / Retweets, Forwards, and Inbound Links, they are referring to Engagement metrics.

When people talk about Form Completions, Email Subscriptions, Blog Comments, and Conversion Rates, they are referring to Lead Generation metrics.

And when people talk about Closed Sales or sales opportunities, they are referring to Sales metrics.

 

 

metrics categories - an overview

Each category has its own strengths and weaknesses when measuring performance, and each contributes its share to profitability.

 

So what optimizes what?

While it appears too direct to say, consumption metrics are used to optimize consumption. Sales metrics help optimize sales. Putting time and resources into one category is a great way to boost metrics for that category. But boosting consumption metrics on the assumption it will boost sales or using consumption metrics to predict sales has inherent weaknesses. As attention becomes a scarce commodity, second screen use becomes prevalent, and mobile becomes a socially acceptable way to kill time, assumptions about metrics need to be adjusted to suit reality.

 

It all depends on the size of the picture

There are a wide variety of consumption metrics that get a lot of attention, yet consumption metrics are just a part of a much bigger picture. Its the sense-making, the putting the metrics into the proper story, that contributes most to business success.

As a possible example, most companies note that mobile has about a half to a quarter of the conversion rate of desktop.

 

most companies note that mobile has about a half to a quarter of the conversion rate of desktop

 

When the focus is on consumption, the orthodox response has been putting more resources into improving the mobile experience. With a focus away from consumption metrics and more towards sales metrics, companies may begin to put more resources into desktop, because that is where sales happen. In our industry we say you can’t help people read when they aren’t there to read, and you can’t help people buy when they aren’t there to buy.

 

you can’t help people read when they aren’t there to read, and you can’t help people buy when they aren’t there to buy

 

Reality is people skim, so our software is designed to help messages stand out when people skim. When it comes to metrics, it may be time to question the effectiveness of trying to get mobile viewers to buy. It’s possible nudging mobile viewers to go to a larger screen may end up lifting the sales metrics more than anything else.

 

It’s possible nudging mobile viewers to go to a larger screen may end up lifting the sales metrics more than anything else

 

Summing up

Tesla has demonstrated that old-fashioned metrics can miss the bigger picture. The challenge is finding that bigger picture specific to the industry and niche your company is in.

To look closer at how metrics affect business success and which strategies best suit your business model, in the following posts we will review the strengths and weaknesses each category brings to the table. What is bread and butter to one business may not work for another.

 

Thanks for reading!

 

Chris, Ken, and Edward

How Tesla can make your metrics better

Metrics can direct (and at times misdirect) crucial site optimizations. Better metrics lead to better investments in time, resources, and strategy.

This post is the first in Asymmetrica Labs series on prioritizing metrics. It presents examples of common problems encountered when relying on some of the most popular metrics.

The other posts in the series provide different perspectives on which metrics are most valuable. The second post helps make sense of metrics by grouping them into 4 broad categories. The third post presents the traditional view of metrics, with consumption metrics driving everything else. The fourth post considers the balanced view, with each metric contributing an equal measure to business success. The fifth and sixth posts look at the business view, and the ‘what pays the bills’ view, respectively.

 

Misleading metrics lead you astray

A recent article in Harvard Business Review (link at bottom) pointed out how Tesla proves classical business metrics are outdated. The gist of the article was about how old-fashioned metrics like market penetration and share of profit miss out on problem penetration – the extent to which current products solve existing and emerging problems. Tesla’s market penetration for electric cars is misleading when people also use Teslas as luxury items, exotic speed machines, and family camping.

Standard metrics often fail when products solve more than one problem in a rapidly changing landscape.

What the Tesla article didn’t go into was the similarities between business metrics and content metrics. When changing times lead to business metrics going wrong, content metrics can go wrong as well.

 

Times change

Famously, there was a time when carpenters used the width of their thumb as a unit of measurement. It’s what we derived the inch from. As for a foot, well, a foot used to be about the length of…

 

A foot is an example of an outdated metric

 

As times changed the width of the thumb or length of a foot just didn’t work as useful units of measurement, so those units were replaced by more accurate ones. Which is important because as second screen use increases (reaching past 90% for millennials), established metrics like dwell time and engagement rates are no longer always accurate indicators of how users are interacting with your information.

established metrics like dwell time and engagement rates are no longer always accurate indicators of how users are interacting with your information.

 

Attention has changed

People don’t sit down and carefully go through one lengthy content offering at a time anymore. Paying attention is no longer like a meal with 2 or 3 big helpings. Now it’s about taking a bit from every part of the all-you-can-eat internet buffet.

 

internet is like a all-you-can-eat buffet

 

It’s evolved into something called the Attention Economy, and it has changed the content landscape.

Here’s a question for you: Ever had a webpage open for 10 minutes on your desktop, because you were busy replying to a notification from your smart-phone?

Here’s another: ever skimmed your email inbox on one screen while also paying attention to another screen?

Dwell time was a great indicator, when second screen use didn’t exist. Now that 87% of people use more than one device at a time, dwell time is as outdated as cases for your sony walkman.

 

Content metrics are as outdated as sony walkmans

 

Time spent on an item turns out to be a rather poor indicator if that time is also spent on 3 or 4 other items, all at the same time. It isn’t about time spent, it’s about quality of attention spent on an item.

It isn’t about time spent, it’s about quality of attention spent on an item.

This doesn’t even touch on the “I can’t believe its not there” phenomenon observed by Neilson Norman group, which pointed out eye-tracking studies and dwell time get confounded when readers repeatedly spend time looking for content they haven’t found. In these cases, the more confusing or inadequate the content, the higher the dwell time.

 

Behavior has changed

Social shares are another indicator that has had a rough time lately. There is an implied assumption that content that gets shared is shared because it’s valued. That it’s been read and considered OK enough to share with others. Unfortunately, stats show that 6 out of 10 people share without even reading the content.

Clickbait was a new phenomena that is being replaced by something even more new. Now we have moved on to sharebait, where content doesn’t even get clicked. It just gets shared.

Another example of an established metric that often does a pretty poor job of measuring how much of your message actually made an impact.

 

The Bifocal view

The Tesla article in Harvard Business Review pointed out the value of taking a ‘bifocal’ view of metrics. The bifocal view considers the way things were (essentially everything standard metrics measure), while also looking ahead at problems that are emerging and where things are going.

 

The bifocal view considers the way things were (essentially everything standard metrics measure), while also looking ahead at problems that are emerging and where things are going.

 

Focusing purely on the past is likely to miss opportunities coming up in the immediate future.

In the upcoming series of posts we will look at examples of metrics that may lead you astray in the emerging Attention Economy and suggest some indicators that yield more insight into what needs prioritizing in a rapidly changing world.

Harvard Business Review article about Tesla is here.

 

Thanks for reading!

Chris, Ken, and Edward